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Dipping into Digital

A story of two digital “dinosaurs” foray into blogging and other digital unknowns!

 

A couple of members of the PDNorth team (Sue Lownsbrough & Petrina Lynn) have begun a journal detailing their journey navigating digital literacies from personal to organisational/work to classroom/training use. They cordially invite PDNorth members to follow them on their journey…

To read more, click the link above!

 

Teaching within the community – It’s not all about grammar!

by Colette Butterworth

 

Why is teaching English in the community so important?

As a teacher of English to members of the Muslim community, I deem teaching the English language within the community to be exceptionally important.  If students are unable to communicate by using the English language in the UK, this becomes a barrier to their inclusion within the social environment. The students value being included in a British setting and being informed of our British values and customs.

So, if it’s not all about grammar, what is it about?  Most of my students are mothers of children who have been born here in Manchester.  Their children go to nursery and school in Manchester.  Their children therefore speak English to their friends and teachers but at home they speak the native tongue of their parents.  If there is a problem at school, these mothers do not have the confidence to speak to their children’s teachers.  If they have a health problem, they often ask their children to translate at the doctors or dentist.  These mothers therefore need to overcome the barriers of exclusion within their society.

Teaching in the community is not simply about building grammar techniques and structuring language correctly; it is about building confidence.  Not only confidence in speaking and listening skills, reading and writing but also in their ability to jump on a bus, speak to a doctor, buy something in a shop and help their children with their homework.  All this, without their husband or their child translating for them.  All this, on their own.  Finding their confidence, autonomy and independence is just as important as gaining an entry level qualification in English.

The students work together to improve their spoken and written English. As their teacher, I would  like to allow them to become more integrated into the society they and their children live in.  I build their confidence by employing activities so they understand the importance of communication, whether it is by sight, sound or touch.

The group have been out on a trip to the Manchester Museum where they had great fun looking at the poisonous frogs and exhibits from their home countries.  We then took the bus into Rusholme and they ordered their own food in a highly recommended kebab house.  Across the road was a sweet shop where they all showed me their favourite desserts.

The students in my community group are of a variety of ages.  They all speak the same language and most have children.  They have varying abilities.  Some have never been to school before and some have high level qualifications from their own country.  However, in this country, my students are confined to their homes because they are relied upon to look after the house, the husband and the children.  They are so committed to their family they feel uncomfortable when leaving the house.  For these students, this session is the highlight of their week.

We are currently planning a cookery day.  I will be showing them how to make a Victoria sponge and they will be showing me how to make samosas and biryani.

So, it’s not all about grammar, but it is about confidence building, having fun and doing things the students have probably never done before.

Encouraging Learner Autonomy

By Anthony Dunne 

PD (Mersey) Maths

 

There are many challenges to be faced when delivering GCSE maths in an FE setting. The time constraints, the apathy of some learners repeating a course they deem pointless or worse, a qualification they fear they will never gain. Ask yourself the question, if you garnered these perspectives, what type of learner would you be? I can answer this with confidence through experience; I was that learner. Me and French were never friends. I felt as though it was pointless (why learn French, they learn English don’t they?) and I was terrible at it. Worst of all my teacher thought the best way to combat this was through shouting and creating an atmosphere of fear. For me this was the worst thing to do. I would down tools or even worse, simply miss the lesson entirely. This is where an empathy for learners who say they ‘hate’ maths has grown from; I know what it is like to dread a subject through a mixture of fear of failure and futility.

 

This led me to the question; how would I have wanted to be taught? Have someone attempt to shout information into me? Or, another way? There is of course no precise other way that will work 100% of the time. If there was, I wouldn’t still be sat in my office typing this article, I would be sipping a beer on a beach enjoying my millions for finding the philosopher’s stone of teaching. However, what I did do this year was a little different to my approach in the past, which resulted in a more engaged cohort and lessons that were more relevant for the learners, namely increasing autonomy for the learners.

 

I am not a fan of buzz words or clichéd phrases, but increasing a learner’s independence should be the principle value of their time at FE; preparing them for employment or higher education. If I can contribute to this in any way, this will be a transferrable skill of merit. So, what did I actually do? The college I work for split our students into two main cohorts; new enrollers and returners. New enrollers are given two lessons per week lasting 90 minutes each. Returners have one lesson for two hours. To maximise this time, I made it clear as early as possible that learners were in charge of their own maths journey. Journey being the operative word; they knew their starting point, they knew their final destination and they all had the right directions given to them. It was up to them to choose the right path. To aid this, every lesson had a theme. Objectives depended on the area which they wished to focus upon. In conjunction with an assessment given to them every six weeks, a choice of three topics, with ramped difficulty within each subject, was given. It was up to the learner to choose what they believed they needed to work up on, with me facilitating and what their objectives should be by the end of the lesson. As they have set their own target, chosen their own work, this autonomy almost acts as self-motivation and competing against themselves. The learners go from passive to active and differentiate themselves.

 

Whether this has a significant impact upon their results will be seen in the coming weeks, but for now, attendance was not the problem it has been in the past, subjectively learners commented they preferred this style and believed they gained from each lesson and perhaps most important for the long term, they enjoyed maths. Whilst this can’t be given a grade, perhaps we sometimes lose focus on what should be important for learners.